COVID vaccination in WA: Travel, family and packed concerts and sport sold in new ad blitz by State Government

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Josh ZimmermanThe West Australian
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VideoAn emotive new advertising campaign encouraging West Australians to get vaccinated hits televisions screens today in an attempt to accelerate the State’s slowing rollout.

Vaccine Commander Chris Dawson has declared complacency rather than supply is now the biggest obstacle to the State’s rollout as the McGowan Government today unveiled a new $3.6 million advertising campaign targeting the 40 per cent of West Australians yet to receive a jab.

A minute-long television commercial depicts international travel, a hospital birth surrounded by family, sold out music concerts and football matches and a 99th birthday party in an attempt to remind West Australians what life was like before the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ad will be screened during the AFL grand final and the campaign will also feature on social media, radio, print and billboards.

Its launch coincides with a decision to allow walk-in vaccinations at the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre clinics between 10am and 5pm for the remainder of the working week.

CHECK OUT THE AD IN THE VIDEO PLAYER ABOVE

“This campaign is targeting those four out of ten (eligible West Australians) who perhaps may be apathetic or not sufficiently motivated at the moment to be vaccinated,” Mr Dawson said, adding a national redistribution of Pfizer doses meant there were now 70,000 bookings available over the next six weeks.

“It's not now a shortage of vaccines, it's willingness of people to come forward,” he said.

A minute-long television commercial depicts a pre-pandemic normal to encourage West Aussies to get the jab.
Camera IconA minute-long television commercial depicts a pre-pandemic normal to encourage West Aussies to get the jab. Credit: WA Govt/WA Govt
The WA Government’s ad sells the return of travel.
Camera IconThe WA Government’s ad sells the return of travel. Credit: WA Govt/WA Govt

“I would rather that we just totally run out of vaccine and we clamour for more.

“At the moment, it's a little mystifying to me that some people have just not been sufficiently motivated.

“Perhaps if they watch at ad then they might realise well, if that's the way we want to live, we've got get vaccinated.”

Mr Dawson said authorities had considered running a pop-up vaccine clinic outside Optus Stadium on the day of the grand final but decided on an information stand instead.

“A couple of reasons for that - people are obviously very keen to get inside the ground (and)… you've got to wait some 15 minutes under supervision, and it needs to be clinical supervision, once someone's vaccinated,” he said.

“So logistically the advice I received was don't vaccinate here but use it as an opportunity to promote.”

The commercial depicts international travel, a hospital birth surrounded by family, sold out music concerts and football matches and a 99th birthday party in an attempt to remind West Australians what life was like before the COVID-19 pandemic.
Camera IconThe commercial depicts international travel, a hospital birth surrounded by family, sold out music concerts and football matches and a 99th birthday party in an attempt to remind West Australians what life was like before the COVID-19 pandemic. Credit: WA Govt/WA Govt
The 60-second nostalgic television commercial was shot and directed in short-film style by emerging WA film director Melle Branson.
Camera IconThe 60-second nostalgic television commercial was shot and directed in short-film style by emerging WA film director Melle Branson. Credit: WA Govt/WA Govt

He said research had uncovered the major reason some West Australians were putting off vaccination was because they did not believe COVID-19 would impact them.

“It's not present in their community, that is a factor,” Mr Dawson said.

“And I think as the Premier has already said, we live, really, in comparison to other places, such free and uncomplicated lives that people don't really sufficiently centre their attention.”

“But I think one of the key messages that this campaign for Rollup WA is actually saying is don't wait until it hits you or a member of your family.

“Just do the right thing now, because we don't want a rush on like we've seen in other places.”

Vaccine Commander Chris Dawson has declared complacency rather than supply is now the biggest obstacle to the State’s rollout.
Camera IconVaccine Commander Chris Dawson has declared complacency rather than supply is now the biggest obstacle to the State’s rollout. Credit: Michael Wilson/The West Australian

Premier Mark McGowan rejected the suggestion the new advertising campaign had come too late, highlighting that the rollout had only recently been extended to include anyone aged 12 and over.

The television commercial for the campaign was directed in short-film style by WA film director Melle Branson, who said she had aimed to “tap into something universal”.

“What I hope to leave the audience of this campaign with (is) to appreciate how lucky we are to be here and to realise the fragility of the life that we've been living and to be inspired to do something for the greater good of humanity,” she said.

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