Albany student container recycling business donates cash to Disabled Surfers Association Great Southern

Sarah MakseAlbany Advertiser
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Albany Secondary Education Support Centre students present Disabled Surfers Association Great Southern president Kerry Ann Oakley with a $500 cheque alongside DSAGS’s Janet McArtney and City of Albany’s Ruth March.
Camera IconAlbany Secondary Education Support Centre students present Disabled Surfers Association Great Southern president Kerry Ann Oakley with a $500 cheque alongside DSAGS’s Janet McArtney and City of Albany’s Ruth March. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

Albany Secondary Education Support Centre students have put their new business skills to good use, donating $500 from their container recycling enterprise to Disabled Surfers Association Great Southern.

The student-driven ASESC Rec Collection launched last year, with students collecting and sorting local businesses’ recycling through WA’s container deposit scheme.

A team of business-savvy students have collected thousands of containers from ASESC, North Albany Senior High School and several clients including the City of Albany.

Funds raised from the containers collected on the school campuses go back into growing the enterprise, while cash from containers collected in the community are donated to a charity picked by the students.

The team raised a total of $2000.

Students handed over a giant cheque to DSAGS president Kerry Ann Oakley and Janet McArtney at the school’s final assembly on Wednesday.

Teacher Jake Butler said it was “incredibly touching” to see the students so passionate about giving back to their community.

“For some in the team, it really hit home when they passed the cheque over and heard all about how it would be spent on a new surfboard and beach toys to improve the program this summer,” he said.

“You just can’t describe or replicate that feeling in the classroom.”

Next year, a new cohort of students will take the reins and vote on another community organisation to benefit from the recycling initiative.

“The big target for the business next year is to raise enough money to fund a trailer to transport the collections,” Mr Butler said.

“The school mini van has been at full capacity in the second half of this year and buying a trailer is definitely the next big step to enabling further growth.

“In addition to this the students will be driving a new marketing campaign to raise awareness of the chosen charity, as well as the school itself.”

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