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State funding allows planning for Albany waterfront to proceed to second stage

Stuart McGuckinAlbany Advertiser
Regional Development Minister Don Punch, Member for Albany Rebecca Stephens and Great Southern Development Commission acting CEO Jarrad Gardner at the Albany waterfront.
Camera IconRegional Development Minister Don Punch, Member for Albany Rebecca Stephens and Great Southern Development Commission acting CEO Jarrad Gardner at the Albany waterfront. Credit: Supplied

Planning for the next stage of the Albany’s waterfront development has started after about $430,000 was allocated for a stage two master plan.

The master plan will aim to unlock the potential of the waterfront precinct which stretches from the Albany port through to the site of the former Albany Woolstores.

Funding to develop the plan includes $409,500 from the State Government and an additional $20,000 from Southern Ports.

Regional Development Minister Don Punch described the waterfront as “iconic” and said it was “one of the most scenic natural harbours in regional WA”.

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“The potential this land has is significant, as is the outcome for the regional economy and livability of the city,” he said.

“We are proud to be supporting this collaborative and conscious planning process, and eventual beneficial developments that will result.”

The potential this land has is significant, as is the outcome for the regional economy and livability of the city.

Regional Development Minister Don Punch

Albany MLA Rebecca Stephens welcomed the funding which she said was a great outcome for Albany.

“(It) will deliver a world-class tourism precinct and benefit our tourism and hospitality businesses, as well as delivering local jobs for the community,” she said.

Southern Ports chief executive Keith Wilks also welcomed the State Government’s funding commitment.

“Not only because of the economic and tourism opportunities it will provide the region, but also because of the natural connection with our Port of Albany as an adjoining land area,” he said.

“The Port’s own master plan, which was completed last year, certainly encourages commercial development around the port’s peripheries, to increase community amenity and to maximise the commercial potential of the port itself.

“There are some terrific natural synergies to be explored and we’re looking forward to seeing what can be achieved.”

There are some terrific natural synergies to be explored and we’re looking forward to seeing what can be achieved.

Southern Ports chief executive Keith Wilks

The master plan process is being led by the Great Southern Development Commission, which completed the first stage late last year.

The second stage included significant collaboration with key agencies including the City of Albany, Wagyl Kaip Southern Noongar Aboriginal Corporation and other stakeholders.

GSDC acting chief executive Jarrad Gardner said the Albany waterfront “holds significant economic, social and cultural value”.

“Our focus in this planning process is very much in line with our priorities as a commission, improving livability for the community, minimising existing barriers to economic growth, and ensuring cultural values and environmental sustainability are embedded in any future development,” he said.

The next phase of the strategic planning process will focus on understanding stakeholder interests, concerns, and aspirations, while moving towards a shared vision for the iconic waterfront.

Various plans for development on lots within the precinct have already been submitted over the past 18 months, including plans for new taverns and a seafood restaurant on the marina.

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