Saviour in the wings for historic mills?

Toby HusseyAlbany Advertiser
Albany Woollen Mills facade.
Camera IconAlbany Woollen Mills facade. Credit: Laurie Benson/Pictures: Laurie Benson, Laurie Benson Albany Advertiser

The disused Albany Woollen Mills could be saved from decay more than 15 years after its doors closed.

The future of the Mill Street site has been uncertain since its closure in 2002, around the same time the landowner unsuccessfully requested to demolish the 75-year-old building.

In September, a City of Albany spokesman said they been unable to meet with Singapore-based landowner Noble Investments.

The Albany Advertiser now understands Noble Investments intends to redevelop the Mill Street site.

Woollen Mills houses on Mill Street.
Camera IconWoollen Mills houses on Mill Street. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser, Laurie Benson Albany Advertiser

Noble Investments senior manager Nicholas Lee said the business would be looking at the land as part of a portfolio-wide review.

“We’re going through a management team restructure,” he said.

“We are going through all our heritage sites and bringing them back up to scratch.”

Mr Lee could not provide a specific date for action on the Woollen Mills.

Woollen Mills houses on Mill Street.
Camera IconWoollen Mills houses on Mill Street. Credit: Laurie Benson Albany Advertiser

The mills operated on Mill Street from 1925 to 2001, and at its peak produced up to 350 tonnes of wool a month.

Noble Investments director Jacky Mulani has significant real estate holdings in Australia.

Albany Woollen Mills facade.
Camera IconAlbany Woollen Mills facade. Credit: Laurie Benson/Pictures: Laurie Benson, Laurie Benson Albany Advertiser

He owns the Araluen Golf Course resort, in the Perth hills, and is understood to have held stakes in multi-million dollar properties across Australia.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails