Recent survey shows change in how the modern world listens to music

Kellie BalaamAlbany Advertiser
Email Kellie Balaam
As we move further into the 21st century it is interesting to see how our habits are changing when it comes to listening to music.
Camera IconAs we move further into the 21st century it is interesting to see how our habits are changing when it comes to listening to music. Credit: George Marks/Getty Images

Do you still listen to the radio? What is your choice of station?

Or do you instead reach for your phone as soon as you jump in your car to blast your favourite Spotify playlist?

As we move further into the 21st century it is interesting to see how our habits are changing when it comes to listening to music.

According to the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s 2020 consumer survey, owning a radio at home is on the way out.

With more than 2000 surveys completed in June by people aged 18 years and over, 93 per cent of respondents had a radio in their car.

But only 60 per cent had one at home — a drop of 7 per cent since ACMA’s 2018 survey.

Eighty-five per cent of people aged over 55 owned a radio at home, but that figured plummeted to 37 per cent in the 18-34 age group.

Music streaming services such as Spotify and Apple Music have revolutionised the way we can access music.

Why tune in to the radio and have your decisions made for you, when you can customise your own playlist full of your own favourite jams and artists?

Personally, I listen to the radio in my car, only preferring to shuffle a playlist of choice from my phone when embarking on a road trip from Albany to Perth.

But I know of other young people who can’t stand listening to the radio.

They like to be in control of what they are listening to as they go about their day.

With the ability to listen to music dependent on your mood, special occasion or genre, many among the younger generation are jumping ship from the radio waves.

Spotify can also come in handy when wanting to discover new singers and bands, all the while giving local musicians an outlet to release original music and reach a broader audience.

Take local Albany indie rock band Pinstripe, for example.

In March, the group reached more than 100,000 streams on Spotify for the release of their debut song Everglow.

For a small band looking for a way into the industry this is a significant step forward.

More well-known on the music scene is Albany rocker Carla Geneve who has nearly 60,000 monthly Spotify listeners and has steadily started rising to fame across the nation.

The Albany Shantymen have also enjoyed Spotify success, benefiting from the #ShantyTok craze that has swept social media this year — and which they helped inspire.

The viral phenomenon started in December after Scottish musician Nathan Evans posted his cover of a sea shanty called Wellerman to the social media app, TikTok.

His single reached No. 1 on the UK charts.

In an article published by iconic music magazine Rolling Stone, Evans credited the Albany Shantymen for inspiring his own wildly popular version of the song.

Views of the Albany group's rendition of Wellerman have now skyrocketed from several thousand to half a million.

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