Player points system in to help ‘even up’ GSFL

Cameron NewboldAlbany Advertiser
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The 2018 Great Southern Football League season will use a player points system under the guidelines set by the WA Country Football League, after league directors ratified it last month.

The highly debated topic was raised late last year as a potential tool to help equalise the GSFL competition and the six participating clubs have now been handed their points allocations for the upcoming season.

Premiers North Albany, who will be shooting for a fifth straight GSFL flag this year, have the smallest points allocation with 27, while fellow traditional Albany-based clubs Royals and Railways have each received 28 points.

Mt Barker and Denmark-Walpole, along with Albany, have been given 50 points to work with under the new system.

Under the system, every player is ranked from one to five points depending on their previous playing history, club of origin and years spent at a club, among other things.

Each club must fit under its points cap and field 22 players for every league game they play in.

GSFL president Joe Burton has declared this system is the way forward, to assist the Sharks, Bulls and Magpies, for whom he has concerns.

“This is about trying to even the competition and for the long-term future of the GSFL,” Burton said.

“We need to keep Sharks, Mt Barker and Denmark-Walpole interested and that’s why they’ve got the most points.

“This system will stop all the good players coming to one team.

“They simply can’t fit them in and hopefully that will mean they will go to one of the other three clubs. “We’ve got to try something and I believe this will work.

“I think it will be revisited at the end of each year.”

A working group with one representative from each club was assembled to set up minor by-laws that affect how the new system is run and ruled.

The Advertiser believes this decision has further strained relationships between several clubs amid the heated debate about how many points each shall receive.

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