Local cricketers unite for Cobba’s Round to raise awareness for mental health

Cameron NewboldAlbany Advertiser
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Jack, Greg and Samuel Steel at Narrikup cricket ground.
Camera IconJack, Greg and Samuel Steel at Narrikup cricket ground.

The local cricket community will unite on Saturday for the second edition of Cobba’s Round, in memory of former player Greg Steel.

Cobba’s Round was to be played in round five of the Albany and Districts Cricket Association last week but was rescheduled due to rain.

Cricketers from around the region will come together to raise awareness for mental health.

Steel was affectionately known as “Cobba” and he called his mates or anyone he crossed paths with by the same name.

After his death last year, the Steel family, along with the Narrikup Cricket Club and ACDA, came together to honour his memory.

On Saturday, players from all clubs will gather in the pavilion at North Road after their on-field battle to raise funds for Beyond Blue.

Burgers will be on sale and the bar will be open.

Headspace Albany will provide change cards that players will be asked to fill out anonymously with a message that has helped them through a hard time.

Olivia, Jack, Samuel and Jo Steel helped initiate Cobba’s Round in honour of Greg Steel who passed away this year.
Camera IconOlivia, Jack, Samuel and Jo Steel helped initiate Cobba’s Round in honour of Greg Steel who passed away this year. Credit: Laurie Benson

At the end of the round the cards will be collected and combined as a statement which headspace Albany will share with the clubs.

WACA Great Southern cricket manager Tim Edmunds last week shared his struggles with mental health in the lead-up to Cobba’s Round.

Edmunds first met Steel in 2014 when they went to junior country week together as coach and manager.

“I was drawn to Greg’s willingness to do anything for the players,” Edmunds said.

“My favourite memory of him was sharing that junior country week with him.”

Edmunds said he hoped events such as Cobba’s Round encouraged more men to speak out about their mental health.

“The stigma is that people think they can’t open up or show any signs of weakness, especially in sport,” he said.

“Most of us are mates and we have a really tight-knit cricket community, so hopefully this project can result in even one person confiding in someone if they are struggling.”

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