Know your limits and heed advice from authorities — police issue reminder after Bluff Knoll rescue

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Two brothers were taken to hospital after a hiking trip to Bluff Knoll went wrong.
Camera IconTwo brothers were taken to hospital after a hiking trip to Bluff Knoll went wrong. Credit: Laurie Benson

Police have issued a reminder to would-be mountain hikers to know their limits and heed advice from authorities after two brothers were taken to hospital from Bluff Knoll.

About 7.15pm last night, emergency services were told a man in his 50s was experiencing joint seizures in his knees and hips and was stranded about 1km up the Bluff Knoll walk trail.

The man and his older brother, a man in his 60s, were told to stay where they were and wait for help to arrive.

However the older brother set off for the carpark.

Along the way, he slipped and hit his head.

He was given first aid and taken to Albany Health Campus while emergency services set off to rescue his younger brother.

SES volunteers reached the younger man, put him in a stretcher and carried him back down the trail to a waiting ambulance.

He was also taken to Albany Health Campus.

No one was seriously injured.

The man was stranded about 1km up the Bluff Knoll walk trail.
Camera IconThe man was stranded about 1km up the Bluff Knoll walk trail.

Gnowangerup Police posted about the operation on Twitter this morning, saying “one rescue turned into two”.

“If you are going to climb Bluff Knoll make sure you are physically/medically fit enough to do so and adhere to advice given,” they said.

Gnowangerup officer-in-charge Sergeant Randall Moulden said the incident should serve as a reminder for people to ensure they were well prepared before tackling nature trails.

“Tracks and trails can be demanding, and even slight changes in terrain can catch people off-guard and result in injury and possibly leave a hiker in need of rescuing,” Sgt Moulden said.

“It is important that anyone who is planning on going hiking ensures they are physically fit and equipped to deal with any terrain they may face.

“Even the best prepared person can find themselves in trouble, so having access to a mobile phone and personal locator beacon at a minimum is critical to being able to alert authorities to being in distress.

“Mobile phones won’t work everywhere, so make sure you have a plan B, such as a personal locator beacon, and remember in bad weather you may end up spending time waiting for rescuers to arrive so ensure you have sufficient water, food and clothing to keep you going while you remain stranded.”

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