IN PICTURES: Albany health services join forces for community NAIDOC Week celebration

Sarah MakseAlbany Advertiser
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Adam Prior, 9, Sonny Smith, 7, and Teliqua Riley-Eades, 7.
Camera IconAdam Prior, 9, Sonny Smith, 7, and Teliqua Riley-Eades, 7. Credit: Laurie Benson/ Albany Advertiser

Albany’s Noongar Centre was a hive of Menang art, music and culture on Friday, as the community celebrated NAIDOC Week.

Poor weather moved the Great Southern Aboriginal Health Service’s NAIDOC Week march indoors this year, but that didn’t stop locals young and old from celebrating.

Tanya and Brylee Paunic, 8.
Camera IconTanya and Brylee Paunic, 8. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

Usually held in July, NAIDOC Week was pushed back until November 8-15 this year because of the COVID-19 crisis.

This year’s theme of Always Was, Always Will Be recognises that First Nations people have occupied the continent for more than 65,000 years as one of the oldest continuing cultures on Earth.

Great Southern Aboriginal Health Service’s James Back, Mary Wynne, Leonie Cook, Shirley Williams, Sonny Smith, 7, Ken Kelly, Iris Woods and WA Country Health Service regional director Geraldine Ennis.
Camera IconGreat Southern Aboriginal Health Service’s James Back, Mary Wynne, Leonie Cook, Shirley Williams, Sonny Smith, 7, Ken Kelly, Iris Woods and WA Country Health Service regional director Geraldine Ennis. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

Health organisations working to improve the wellbeing of Great Southern Aboriginal communities joined forces for the event, hosted by the Great Southern Aboriginal Health Service.

Manager James Back said NAIDOC Week was one of the best weeks on the calendar for the organisation.

Museum of the Great Southern’s Kathleen Toomath.
Camera IconMuseum of the Great Southern’s Kathleen Toomath. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

“NAIDOC Week is a celebration of the world’s longest living culture,” he said.

“It’s about debunking all of the myths that we have learnt as Australians.

“My generation particularly was told that Australia began with Captain Cook.

“Yet I stand next to my Aboriginal friends and colleagues and they celebrate 3000 generations of being Australian.

“There is so much wisdom and knowledge to learn.”

Tre Karne Eades, 10.
Camera IconTre Karne Eades, 10. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

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