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Denmark’s Cannabis Botanical Distillery preparing to launch first whisky after two-year wait

Stuart McGuckinAlbany Advertiser
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The final stages of a two-year-long ageing process in the coming months will pave the way for Denmark’s first rum and whisky distillery to open its doors early next year.
Camera IconThe final stages of a two-year-long ageing process in the coming months will pave the way for Denmark’s first rum and whisky distillery to open its doors early next year. Credit: Lajos Varga

Denmark’s first rum and whisky distillery will open its doors early next year as a two-year ageing process enters its final stage in the coming months.

The Cannabis Botanical Distillery will be able to add single malt whiskey to its growing sustainable beverage range, which already boasts gins, vodkas and whole hemp spirits.

CBD chief executive Matt Beaton said the artisan whisky will have a fresh flavour influenced by its seaside setting.

“The coastal influence on Denmark’s first Whiskey Distillery can’t be overlooked, and it’s no mystery as to why some of the best drams were born in Ireland and Scotland, both flanked by sea, pristine air quality, rolling green pastures and an amazing quality of fresh water,” he said.

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“The distillery’s location is lucky enough to share the same limestone-filtered aquifers originating from William Bay National Park and flowing into the dam via springs.

CBD chief executive Matt Beaton said the artisan whisky will have a fresh flavour influenced by its seaside setting.
Camera IconCBD chief executive Matt Beaton said the artisan whisky will have a fresh flavour influenced by its seaside setting. Credit: Rachel Claire/@fieldnotes

“This provides an incredibly viable and sustainable water source and clean canvas to work from in the distilling process.”

Head distiller Ben Kagi, who has more than three decades of distilling experience, said his love for whisky came from concentrating flavours to a deeper level than any other spirit.

He said his agriculture, wine-making and distilling studies had set him up for his “niche, future-focused role at CBD”.

“I’m able to work with raw ingredients at a microbiological level and turn them into something really special for the consumer whilst experimenting and discovering uses of by-products in agriculture along the way,” he said.

Denmark’s Cannabis Botanical Distillery in operation.
Camera IconDenmark’s Cannabis Botanical Distillery in operation. Credit: Lajos Varga

Mr Kagi said he enjoyed working simultaneously as an artist and scientist to develop the perfect blend for distilling.

“Whisky distilling is an art form inspired by surroundings and natural elements,” he said.

Here in Denmark, we have the perfect environment, creative minds and unparalleled skill working to bring you a line of smooth, heart-warming whiskies layered with flavours of the Great Southern.”

Mr Beaton is also proud that CBD’s foray into whisky production has been built on sustainability and no-waste initiatives.

“WA-grown barley is one of the by-products in the whisky maturing process; instead of wasting this, we feed this highly nutritious feed to our herd of 400 Raintree farm cattle,” he said.

“Water is sourced from the dam, barrels are recycled from local wineries, and like CBD, we operate on a cradle-to-grave mentality in everything we do.”

CBD will be taking expressions of interest for a distillery loyalty program that will see hands-on involvement from Great Southerners as they build together a community of local whisky enthusiasts.

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