Container deposit scheme a hit among Albany recyclers

Sarah MakseAlbany Advertiser
Containers for Change Albany manager Kate Ryan-Taylor, Environment Minister Stephen Dawson and Green Skills Albany manager Anne Sparrow.
Camera IconContainers for Change Albany manager Kate Ryan-Taylor, Environment Minister Stephen Dawson and Green Skills Albany manager Anne Sparrow. Credit: Sarah Makse/ Albany Advertiser

Albany residents are cashing in on WA’s container deposit scheme, with one local refund point receiving about 130,000 donations within the first two weeks of its launch.

More than 10 million containers have been deposited across the State within the first fortnight of the Containers for Change scheme, returning 10¢ for every eligible container to keep or donate.

About 350,000 containers have been deposited in the Great Southern across seven refund points from Katanning to Bremer Bay.

Green Skills Albany’s Centennial Park recycling depot has been a hive of activity since the scheme’s launch on October 1, with car-loads of bottles and cans being deposited daily.

The depot started with two employees, but has since taken on 11 additional staff after being overwhelmed with donations.

Container Recycling Albany manager Kate Ryan-Taylor said the team was thrilled to be able to offer work to people of all abilities.

“The first few days were a little bit slow, but as the word got out it’s been increasingly more busy every day with more people, bigger loads, more fun and positive energy,” she said.

Green Skills Albany manager Anne Sparrow and Albany Container Recycling manager Kate Ryan-Taylor.
Camera IconGreen Skills Albany manager Anne Sparrow and Albany Container Recycling manager Kate Ryan-Taylor. Credit: Sarah Makse/ Albany Advertiser

“You get really excited to come to work, even though you are working really hard because there is so much coming in.

“You really feel like you are making a difference.”

To kick off the scheme, Environment Minister Stephen Dawson visited the Container Recycling Albany depot in Centennial Park earlier this month.

Mr Dawson said the depot was just one of the scheme’s many success stories.

“It so heartening to hear that they started off last week with two employees and they are now up to 13,” he said.

“This scheme is about job creation but it is also about protecting the environment and they are doing both here.”

Ms Ryan-Taylor said the depot was helping people from all walks of life.

“We have people who are increasing their income and getting above the poverty line, who are making a real concerted effort to search roadsides and beaches,” she said.

“There’s a lot of people who want to donate to community groups and whilst they don’t have the money to donate, they can donate cans.

“It is not costing them and it is making a real change for their community.”

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