Camera catches animals in action

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The koomal acting all tough for the camera
Camera IconThe koomal acting all tough for the camera

An array of cute and vulnerable native animals have been recorded by the Department of Biodiversity Attraction during their camera trapping program in the Southern jarrah forest.

By using a remote sensor camera, DBCA was able to capture native mammal species activity across the forest, from Nannup to Rocky Gully.

25 mammals captured in the program.
Camera Icon25 mammals captured in the program.

The two-year long camera trapping program recorded a total of 25 mammals in the area including nine threatened species, such as the woylie, numbat, western ringtail possum, brush-tailed phascogale, quokka, tamma, quenda and a western brush wallaby.

A quokka
Camera IconA quokka

The aim of this study was to use remote sensor camera data to quantify the distribution, occupancy and activity of introduced and native mammal species across the southern jarrah forest.

25 mammals captured in the program.
Camera Icon25 mammals captured in the program.

DBCA scientists collected more than 1.6 million photos during the trapping program, including a picture of a common brushtail possum known as a koomal (pictured below) that often stood up in front of the sensor camera.

There were also a total of 28 bird and four reptile species recorded during the program.

25 mammals captured in the program.
Camera Icon25 mammals captured in the program.

A DBCA spokesperson said the majority of wildlife in the area was vulnerable to predation by foxes and cats. The data will help refine the State’s 1080 baiting program under the Western Shield Wildlife recovery program.

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