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Albany’s new trail terminus officially opened on York Street

Headshot of Sarah Makse
Sarah MakseAlbany Advertiser
Albany Mayor Dennis Wellington, Albany MLA Rebecca Stephens, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions’ Peter Hatley, Luke Coney, Jarred Pedro, Mike Shepard and City of Albany chief executive Andrew Sharpe.
Camera IconAlbany Mayor Dennis Wellington, Albany MLA Rebecca Stephens, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions’ Peter Hatley, Luke Coney, Jarred Pedro, Mike Shepard and City of Albany chief executive Andrew Sharpe. Credit: Laurie Benson/Albany Advertiser

Albany’s new Bibbulmun Track and Munda Biddi Trail terminus have been officially opened on York Street, ready to guide visitors directly to the heart of the city.

Work on the $178,000 project started in April to move the southern terminus of the two trails from Proudlove Parade near the old visitor centre to Alison Hartman Gardens.

The Bibbulmun Track stretches 1000km from Kalamunda to Albany, while the Munda Biddi Trail is the longest off-road cycling track of its kind in the world. The trails bring thousands of visitors to the Great Southern each year.

The new terminus, which is already being used by avid hikers and cyclists, features decking, bike racks, seating and signs, and provides easy access to the Albany Visitor Centre.

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It comes more than a year after the Albany City Council voted to adopt a concept design and manage construction of the project.

The concept design was developed by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, which funded the project in partnership with the Great Southern Development Commission.

At the official opening of the terminus on Monday, Albany MLA Rebecca Stephens said it was a fitting way for hikers and cyclists to celebrate the start or completion of the trails.

“The new terminus complements the visitor centre’s role in promoting tourism in the Great Southern region, catering to the significant increase in active walking and cycling holidays we’ve seen develop worldwide over the last year, and now locally,” she said.

“The Great Southern Adventure Trails project will raise the profile of the Albany region and is great for the Albany community and families to enjoy this wonderful part of the world.”

DBCA acting Albany district manager Luke Coney said feedback from hikers and cyclists had been overwhelmingly positive.

“It is great to bring it into the centre of town and be part of the hustle and bustle,” he said.

“It is great for both social and economic development in the town, and also local jobs associated with the trails and supplying people on the trails. In the last 18 months, there has certainly been a boom and an upward trend in people getting out and about.”

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