Aboriginal Medal honour an inspirational moment

Tim EdmundsAlbany Advertiser
Albany Detective Senior Constable Chris Macaulay receives the Aboriginal Service Medal from Commissioner Chris Dawson.
Camera IconAlbany Detective Senior Constable Chris Macaulay receives the Aboriginal Service Medal from Commissioner Chris Dawson. Credit: WA Police

An Albany police officer has been recognised among the first recipients of the inaugural Aboriginal Service Medal at Government House last week.

Det-Sen. Const. Chris Macaulay, one of 51 recipients from across WA, hopes the recognition of their service and commitment will lead to more Aboriginal people joining the police force.

Det-Sen. Const. Macaulay has been based in Albany for two years having previously served in Bayswater, Waroona, Pinjarra, Mandurah and Gnowangerup in his 11 years as a police officer.

“It’s a very proud moment for Aboriginal people,” he said.

“It’s obviously a long time coming and I think a lot of us were talking about it yesterday, having a leader such as our commissioner with the courage to come forward and do what he did.

“It sends a very strong signal that Aboriginal people have been in the police force for a very long time and have been a very big influence.

“Hopefully it shows all the young ones they can come forward and give policing a go.

“That’s what I would like to see — a few more Aboriginals in the police force.”

Thursday’s ceremony followed a two-day Aboriginal employee “Dandjoo”, or “gathering”, which also included the launch of the WA Police Force Reconciliation Action Plan.

Last year Commissioner Chris Dawson issued an apology on behalf of the WA police to Aboriginal people with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags flown outside police headquarters.

Commissioner Dawson said the medal ceremony was a first, and another important step in the reconciliation between Aboriginal people and the police.

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